Review: 2014 Acura RDX AWD with Technology

Friday December 6th, 2013 at 3:1212 PM
Posted by: D.Colman

By David Colman

Hypes: More Computing Power Than Apollo, Slick Quick Handler
Gripes: Manual Hood Prop on a Forty Grand SUV?

The latest 2014 RDX builds on the positive changes accomplished for 2013, when Acura redid the RDX by installing a 3.5 liter V-6 instead of the previous version’s 2.5 liter turbocharged inline 4. This engine compartment transplant makes a compelling case for giving the formerly underpowered RDX another look. Instead of the turbo motor’s peaky power band and inadequate torque, you’ll revel in the V6′ 273hp and 251 lb.-ft. of torque. There’s more than enough grunt to spin the wheels from a standing start, and you’ll never be disappointed in this engine’s passing lane performance. Connected to the transversely mounted V6 is a 6-speed automatic with well-staged gear sets designed to optimize performance of this 6,800rpm redline engine. You can select your own gear of choice by popping the floor stick into its manual gate, or accomplish the same task by blipping up shift and downshift pads adjacent to the steering wheel. The all-wheel-drive technology RDX, which carries a base price of $39,420, extracts a premium of $1,400 over a similarly equipped two wheel drive model. The upgrade is well worth the additional outlay for the extra grip and security afforded by driving all four wheels. We had a tough time finding the cornering limits of this SUV on dry pavement. Its Michelin Primacy MXM4 tires (235/60R18) hardly ever issued a squeal of discomfort, despite the fact that their tall 60 series sidewall height is far from optimal for sporting assignments.

Over the past several years, Acura has remade this premium Honda brand into a feast for technology lovers. The latest RDX is crammed with features that will delight demanding technocrats. For example, you never need to fumble your key into the ignition slot because a cinnamon red metallic “Stop/Start” button next to the steering wheel forever relieves you of insertion duties. When you engage reverse gear a real time view of the area behind your MDX illuminates the standard Navigation screen, complete with yellow parking guidelines to assist you in judging distance. By pressing “Enter” on the center console’s beefy control knob, you can even toggle the rear display to switch between wide angle, overhead or standard rear views. Moreover, should you wish to remove the yellow guidelines from the picture, simply press the “Cancel” button on the console and hold it down for 3 seconds. You can also program the outside rear view mirrors to tilt down when reverse gear is engaged to improve your view of the curb for parallel parking. This feature can also be engaged or disengaged at will. Talk about customization!

The interior design of the RDX cabin is soothing and spacious. Our “graphite luster metallic” example featured expensive looking mocha leather seats and door panels that contrasted subtly with the chocolate tinted dash and center console. A matte finished pewter molding separated the two interior tone zones. Each front seat features a “Driving Position Memory System” which allows you to retain two favorite seat and mirror positions. Both front seats include standard 2-stage heat settings.

Although the large central Navigation screen, which is shielded by a Visigoth-like hood, looks rather intimidating at first, the cavernous design serves its purpose well by screening out errant light during daytime driving. You can enter a destination into the system by using voice commands (say “Display Destination”) or instruct the data base to search for an ATM, gas station, restaurant or movie theater by saying “Find Nearest…” The Navigation unit also provides you with AcuraLink Real Time Traffic and Real Time Weather, to help you avoid unexpected jams or inclement weather. You can use verbal commands to instruct the system to “Avoid” specific routes, or say “Display Traffic List” to garner a report of nearby incidents to circumvent. Likewise, by saying “Weather Forecast” you can check on the 1-3 day picture, or say “Radar Map” to elicit the kind of color-coded forecast you see on your nightly newscast.

This all encompassing technology package requires you to exert judicious restraint while driving. It’s all too easy to issue verbal commands while ignoring the demands of traffic. If you can keep your mind on your driving while playing the system intelligently at stoplights, your RDX experience will be rich and rewarding, because this SUV is as much fun to drive as it is to command.

2014 Acura RDX AWD with Technology

  • Engine: 3.5 liter DOHC, 24 Valve V-6
  • Horsepower: 273 hp
  • Torque: 251 lb.-ft.
  • Fuel Consumption: 19 MPG City/27 MPG Highway
  • Price as Tested: $40,315
  • Star Rating: 9 out of 10 Stars

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Review: 2014 Acura RLX

Thursday October 3rd, 2013 at 8:1010 AM
Posted by: D.Colman

By David Colman

Hypes: Every Save-You-From-Yourself Option Imaginable
Gripes: Pillow-Soft Ride, Acronym Insanity, Confusing Rear View Mirror

Welcome to the brave new world of Acura acronyms. Although Acura has yet to introduce a George Orwell signature version of the RLX, one should be in the offing to celebrate the 30 year anniversary of 1984. When you push the red metallic start button on the dash of the plush new RLX luxury sedan, you’ll be confronted with such a bewildering array of acronyms illuminating the instrument binnacle that you’ll need Acura’s 52 page “Advanced Technology Guide” before venturing forth. This well illustrated booklet will explain the mysteries of RLX life to the uninitiated. What, you might legitimately ask, does “CMBS” mean? The Collision Mitigation Braking System alerts you to an impending frontal crash and operates 4 stages of audible warning/brake application to lessen impact. You can even chose from 4 distances to initiate the progression. Like CMBS, FCW, or Forward Collision Warning uses a camera mounted between the windshield and the rear view mirror to warn you of impending frontal crashes. Unlike CMBS, FCW does not actually apply your brakes.

ACC references Adaptive Cruise Control, which uses the same technology as FCW to maintain space behind the vehicle in front of you when you’ve engaged cruise control. In theory, ACC sounds good, but in practice it leads to a lot more braking and accelerating than you would manage with your own foot on the throttle. LDW and LKAS complete the befuddling compliment of acronym assists. Lane Departure Warning (LDW) sounds a beep if you stray from your lane without first using your turn signal. The Lane Keeping Assist System (LKAS) uses that same overhead camera to warn you of errant lane changes, while going one step further by intervening physically. LKAS actually applies correctional torque to the steering mechanism. While LKAS works to keep you in your lane, the confusing dual-image rear view mirror confuses you enough to cause lane wander.
Aside from all the whiz-bang gadgetry, how does the redesigned RLX function as a driver? Pretty well, actually, especially after you first take time to turn off all the nanny nagging beeps and buzzers. The interior is sumptuous and elegant in the manner pioneered long ago by Acura’s first offering in the luxury field, the Legend, a breakthrough sedan which pre-dated Infiniti’s Q45 and Lexus’ LS 400. The RLX is exceptionally spacious, with its wheelbase of 112 inches offering massive legroom for both front and rear seat occupants. At 75 inches, it’s also an inch wider than a Lexus LS 400, so there’s plenty of sprawl room for everyone on long trips. Because the cavernous trunk swallows 15 cubic feet of luggage, a family of 4 can comfortably vacation with all their belongings under cover.

The downside of the space equation is weight, and the RLX has plenty of that at 3,970 pounds. Even though its stout 3.5 liter V-6 makes a respectable 310hp, the car’s power-to-weight ratio of 12.8 pounds per horsepower will not incite sporty driving. The RLX is so softly sprung that it will pitch you off your seat when the suspension rebounds over mild pavement dips and rises. Through sweeping turns, the RLX tracks nicely on its low profile, all-season Michelin Primacy MXM4 tires (245/40R19). On tighter turns, the front-wheel-drive RLX develops pronounced understeer due to its 61/39 front end weight bias. Fortunately, you can dial up a better snubbed ride and quicker throttle response by engaging Sport mode. Unfortunately. the RLX inexplicably defaults to its soft ride setting whenever the engine is switched off.

If you’re looking for a sporty upgrade for your RLX, Acura offers a 370hp V-6 Hybrid combo that should wake up the sleeping giant while returning 30 MPG. The base model V-6 of our test car is good for 20 MPG around town, and 31 MPG on the freeway. One of the most rewarding aspects of Acura ownership is Acura Total Luxury Care (ATLC), which provides you and your RLX with a personalized home page that covers accessories, model specifications, current Acura Financial Services billing, and email reminder notices for service. ATLC also offers 24-hour roadside assistance, and trip planning services that include computerized routing and map information, message relay and airline ticketing. These all inclusive freebies are just part of the housewarming party you’ll get every time you climb into the well tailored cabin of your RLX. If future speak is your native language, RLX is your car.

2014 Acura RLX

  • Engine: 3.5 liter V-6
  • Horsepower: 310 hp
  • Torque: 271 lb.-ft.
  • Fuel Consumption: 20 MPG City/31 MPG Highway
  • Price as Tested: $48,450
  • Star Rating: 8 out of 10 Stars

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Tested: 2014 Acura RLX

Friday August 23rd, 2013 at 4:88 PM
Posted by: Francois

What’s New

All new for 2014, the Acura RLX is a full-size luxury sedan powered by a 3.5-liter V6 that produces 310 hp and 272 lb-ft of torque. A smooth ride is made possible by a double wishbone suspension and Precision All Wheel Steer (P-AWS) system. FWD is paired to a 6-speed automatic transmission with Sequential SportShift paddle shifters to enable an EPA estimated range of 20 mpg city to 34 mpg highway. Features include multi-view rear view camera, Jewel Eye LED headlights, rear sunshades, keyless start, Krell audio system, and navigation.

The RLX replaces the aging RL sedan. It’s an entirely new design with a new 3.5-liter V6, all-wheel steering and a host of new electronic safety and infotainment features.

The 2014 Acura RLX replaces the aging and rather forgettable RL sedan and it comes none to soon. The RL, while competent, had fallen behind most of the major luxury brands in terms of features, power and price. It was even in danger or being run over by Hyundai’s high-end models. But the RLX remedies all that, with an elegant new cabin, lots of electronic goodies and best of all, performance handling that places it near the top of its field. Acura’s new Precision All-Wheel Steering (P-AWS) employs electronic actuators that steer the rear wheels in conjunction with the front. The result is one of the best handling front-drive cars we’ve driven. Of course, we doubt many RLX drivers will ever push their cars to the limits we did, but it’s nice to know that when spirited drives or emergency maneuvers arise, the RLX has the athleticism to handle whatever is thrown its way. It remains to be seen, however, if consumers will be willing to pony up as much as $60,000 (the starting price is around $48,000) for a car with rather subdued styling and no V8 engine option.

Pros

  • Luxury car ride with performance car handling; huge interior; cutting edge infotainment and audio options; super comfy front seats

Cons

  • Pricing is a bit high; poor city fuel economy figures; subdued styling and interior color choices

Comfort & Utility

Nobody likes a cramped luxury car, least of all Americans. We need room to stretch and sprawl, which is why we think Americans will love what Acura has created inside the RLX. The car’s cabin has all the prerequisite bells and whistles, along with copious amounts of leather on the seats, doors, dash and console. But what really stands out are the supremely supportive and comfortable front seats and the abundance of space, not just for legs and heads, but elbows and hips too. In fact, there is so much space between the driver’s seat and the door armrest that my arm kept falling into the gulch separating the two. This same theme carries over to the rear seat, where two fairly tall adults can comfortably sit for hours.

From the driver’s seat, the RLX controls are numerous, but logically arranged and fairly intuitive. Immediately to the driver’s right are two large LCD screens, one that operates controls for heating and ventilation, audio and Bluetooth cell phone functions and the other to display the available navigation screen. We like this setup and wish more manufacturers would follow suit, although we must complain that there are too many menu-driven steps to perform simple functions like adjusting the fan speed. Sometimes, a simple rotary knob is all that is required. The RLX model’s steering wheel is festooned with buttons, some redundant for the audio and some primary for the adaptive cruise control and Bluetooth, as well as the multi-tasking information screen. We didn’t like that the primary stalks for the headlights, wipers and turn signals were obscured from view, making it nearly impossible to read their functions.

One last observation pertains to the cabin at highway speed. Where we expect an Acura to be quiet, the RLX goes above and beyond, isolating out the most annoying noises while still allowing in just the right amount of engine and exhaust notes so as not to give the impression you’re driving a cocoon.

Technology

Technology is always a strong suit with Acura and the 2014 RLX doesn’t disappoint. The list begins with a suite of active safety features designed to help keep the driver’s attention on the road ahead. Included in the group are Lane Keep Assist, Blind Spot Information (BLIS), Adaptive Cruise Control (maintains a safe distance between you and the traffic ahead) and Collision Mitigation Braking. However, to get the BLIS system requires purchasing the Technology Package, while the Adaptive Cruise Control and Lane Keep Assist can only be had by purchasing the Advance Package option.

The Krell Audio Package brings a high-end Krell audio system with 14 speakers, while the Navigation Package adds a voice-activated navigation system with 8-inch touchscreen. Included with the navigation package is AcuraLink, a system with real-time traffic updates, as well as 2-way communication with the web and apps through a cloud based service. For a slight fee, users can add more features, including automatic collision notification, stolen vehicle locator, in-vehicle local search or search by voice and a personal assistant featuring a live person on call 24/7 to assist you.

Other available features of note include jewel-eyed LED headlamps, power retractable side mirrors, a rearview camera, Smart Key entry with push-button start, heated rear seats, rain sensing wipers and rear parking sensors.

Performance & Fuel Economy

To power its new luxury sedan, Acura conjured up an all-new 3.5-liter V6 engine equipped with direct-injection technology. Direct injection provides a better way to deliver fuel to the engine resulting in more power and better fuel economy. Rated at 310 horsepower and 272 lb-ft of torque, the RLX model’s V6 is no slouch, although it still doesn’t offer up the kind of gut-punching start you feel with a nice, torque happy V8. Fuel economy figures are a mixed bag, with a rather dismal city rating of just 20 miles per gallon, but a much better highway figure approaching 31 mpg.

Safety

Acura has taken pains to ensure the RLX will sail through all its crash tests, anticipating a 5 star rating from the government and a good rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Standard safety equipment includes full airbag protection, including a driver’s side front knee airbag. Additional equipment such as Forward Collision Warning and Lane Departure Warning can help avoid accidents, as can the advanced suspension and steering assists.

Driving Impressions

Over long stretches of paved roadway, the RLX cruises effortlessly, almost serenely, as it absorbs bumps and blemishes and delivers a first class luxury car ride. The trick up its sleeve, however, comes when the road begins to twist and wind. Where other luxury cars become wallowing marshmallows with tires squealing at every turn, the RLX carves through s-shaped asphalt like a scalpel-wielding surgeon late for his tee off time. The RLX model’s electrically-assisted power steering feels direct and precise and the 6-speed automatic transmission is responsive and quick to pick the right gear when extra throttle is administered. But it’s the RLX model’s P-AWS coupled with the Agile Handling Assist (it uses active braking to help keep the RLX traveling on the intended path) that really gives this big sedan its moves. A front double wishbone suspension and multi-link rear suspension setup fits this car perfectly, allowing us to tear around corners on an enclosed track with abilities previously known only to Acura’s legendary sport coupe, the NSX.

Other Cars to Consider

BMW 5 Series: The 5 Series isn’t as roomy inside as the RLX and its ride tends be a bit on the stiff side. However, the rear-drive 5 Series still feels a bit more agile in the curves and it can be had with a manual transmission and V8 engine.

Audi A6: Although the A6 isn’t as powerful as the RLX and its suspension feels somewhat softer, the A6 model’s interior outshines the RLX, as does its exterior styling.

Infiniti M37: A nicely equipped M37 costs about the same as the RLX with the Advanced Package and offers more hp but worse fuel economy. The M model’s color palate is rather drab and its rear seat is not as accommodating as in the RLX.

Bottom Line

It’s not an incredible car handling experience but it is a sophisticated and satisfying driving experience. The Krell stereo is truly world class and the use of LED headlights is ground-breaking indeed. The RL is looking for a strong model identity and this is a step in the right direction.

Specifications

  • Base price: $49,345
  • Price as tested: $61,345
  • Powertrain: Naturally aspirated direct-injection 3.5-liter SOHC 60-degree V6 with variable valve timing and lift and variable cylinder management; six-speed automatic transmission with manual-shift mode; front-wheel drive
  • Horsepower/torque: 310 hp at 6,500 rpm; 272 pound-feet at 4,500 rpm
  • Length/weight: 196.1 inches/3,997 pounds
  • Wheelbase: 112.2 inches
  • 0-60 mph: 7 seconds
  • EPA fuel economy: 20/31/24 mpg, city/highway/combined
  • Cargo capacity: 15.1 cubic feet (with Krell audio and Advance package)
  • MSRP: $54,450 (base)

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2013 Acura ILX Premium Review

Wednesday January 9th, 2013 at 10:11 AM
Posted by: D.Colman

By David Colman

Hypes: Looks Like Clark Kent Runs Like Superman
Gripes: Could Do With Plus One Wheels and Tires

The Sleeper of the Year award goes to Acura for this all-new ILX. Here is an unprepossessing 4-door sedan with devastating performance thanks to gymnastic handling and a rev-happy motor. Yet all this latent potential is cloaked by an average looking body shell that would lead you to suspect the ILX is just another boring family car. To the contrary, this latest Acura hot rod is the proud successor to the recently departed and much celebrated Integra Type R. If you will recall, the Type R was the ultimate driving connoisseur’s bargain, an agile and peaky ride that pushed every Pavlovian reaction button for the enthusiast. In turn, the Type R was successor to a long line of deceptively docile looking ancestors from other manufacturers, including Alfa’s Berlina 4-door, Datsun’s iconic 510, and Nissan’s Sentra SE-R.

Best of all, and in keeping with the best sleeper tradition, the price of the ILX is modest enough to make it affordable to the enthusiast without BMW bucks to spend. In “Premium” form, this Acura lists for just $29,200 complete with just about everything you’ll want or need from a daily driver, including 7 speaker sound system, 3 months of free XM Satellite Radio, leather trimmed sports seats, 17” x 7” alloy rims, Xenon HD headlights, and Michelin MXM4 Pilot tires (215/45R17). Best of all the standard equipement is the zingy powerplant under the hood, which displaces 2.4 liters, and produces 210hp at a screaming 8,000rpm.

This is one Acura you’ll definitely want to buy with the standard 6-speed manual transmission. The gear actuation is so precise that shifting from one gate to another feels like making scalpel incisions. The ratios are perfectly spaced to pick up engine rpm at the top end of the scale each time you up shift, so there’s no appreciable loss of thrust. Acura’s VTEC valve actuation is the best in the business. At low speeds, when pottering around town , the valvetrain opts for less overlap and duration to increase mileage and lesson noise. But when you flat foot the gas, the cam timing changes as the VTEC system locks into its performance profile. As the rpm pass 6,000, the engine converts itself into a ferocious beast that suddenly snarls loudly through the free-flow exhaust. Thanks to this aural guide, you hardly need to consult the tachometer about when to up shift. For the record, the tach reads to 8,000rpm, and extracting maximum output from the ILX is reminiscent of riding a Honda CBR superbike, or driving their lamented, recently departed S2000 sports car. Once you rock this motor into its powerband, you’ll never want to stop repeating the trick – for aural gratification is no other reason. And that’s what driving fun is all about, isn’t it?

All these Dr. Jekyll characteristics are perfectly masked by the ILX’ Mr. Hyde exterior treatment, which is so sedate as to render it indistinguishable from dozens of other family sedans on the road. You won’t find any blatant spoilers front or rear, nor any striping or decoration giveaways about the thumping nature of this beast. The ILX is the perfect antidote to decorated pretend racers like the Camaro SS, Mustang GT and Challenger R/T that scream performance but in fact are no quicker over any given piece of road than this Acura.

The ILX is based on Honda’s Civic Si platform, but it bests the Civic in so many ways that the comparison is odious. If you think of the ILX as an Si that’s grown up and graduated from charm school, you’ll get the idea.

2013 Acura ILX Premium

  • Engine: 2.4 liter DOHC 16 valve inline 4 with I-VTEC
  • Horsepower: 201hp
  • Torque: 170 lb.-ft.
  • Fuel Consumption: 22 MPG City/31 MPG Highway
  • Price as Tested: $30,095
  • Star Rating: 9.5 out of 10 Stars

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2012 Acura TSX Special Edition Review

Tuesday March 20th, 2012 at 1:33 PM
Posted by: D.Colman

By David Colman

For: Refined reflexes, Superb shift, Zingy motor
Against: Low torque = peaky performance

Since the demise of the ground-breaking NSX sports car and the discontinuation of the razor sharp Integra Type R, Acura has become an invisible brand to enthusiasts. But for 2012, the luxury division of Honda has introduced a sports-flavored Special Edition version of their most affordable TSX sedan that will have erstwhile marque supporters rallying for a closer look.

The TSX SE is Acura’s best shot at a sports sedan. Unlike any other product in the company’s extensive line, this one is available with a manual transmission 6-speed. The gearbox is a delight to use, with short throws, predictable clutch engagement, and a neatly crafted shift knob that makes you want to work the gearbox even more than you need.

Best of all, those 6 closely spaced ratios control a typical high revving Honda motor that loves to be run to peak rpm in each gear. The exhaust note of the iVTEC 4 cylinder, DOHC, 16 valve engine changes from a purr to a snarl as the variable valve timing kicks in at about 5,500 rpm. By the time you’re ready to upshift, the tachometer needle has zinged past 7,000rpm, and the 201hp motor is emitting a full banshee wail. You’ll never tire of the TSX’s soundtrack. In a model line full of over-refined Acuras, the TSX is the guttural exception, the only Acura that speaks to Honda’s proud roots in racing.

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2011 Acura TSX Sport Wagon Review

Tuesday August 9th, 2011 at 9:88 AM
Posted by: Derek

2011 Acura TSX Sport Wagon
By Derek Mau

Likes:

  • Adept handling for a wagon
  • Powertrain provides nice balance of power and economy
  • Comfortable cabin
  • A luxury car with lots of cargo room
  • Optional Acura/ELS surround sound system

Dislikes:

  • 5-speed transmission automatic transmission
  • No V6 or 6-speed manual option for North American market
  • Navigation system needs to catch up to the competition
  • Backseat legroom is tight for taller passengers

Since the SUV started dominating car sales, the station wagon has fallen in status somewhere between the microcar (e.g. Smart car) and the minivan. In the era of the Ford Country Squire your parents appreciated them. Nowadays, auto journalists and Europeans are the select few who fully appreciate their form and function, but nobody buys them here. It’s that last trait that’s led to the near extinction of the family wagon.

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2011 Acura RL Review – More Than Just a Fancy Accord

Thursday April 21st, 2011 at 2:44 PM
Posted by: the911guy

2011
By Dan Tsuchiya

Pros

  • Unflappable SH-AWD system makes for a great poor weather driver
  • Smooth power delivery and very controlled in the turns
  • Interior features and details

Cons

  • Uninspired styling
  • User interface for radio and satellite not best in class
  • Rear seat leg room could be better

The sea of mid/large-sized luxury sedans has grown over the years, primarily because this is still a lucrative class of automobiles for manufacturers. Luxury car brands are fighting for those hard earned consumer dollars in the $45-$70k range and unlike their value oriented cousins, there is still a lot of margin in these vehicles.

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ZL1 Camaro, Redesigned 2012 Acura TL, Audi TT RS – 2011 Chicago Auto Show

Saturday February 12th, 2011 at 2:22 PM
Posted by: ponycargirl

Article and photos by Megan Green

Camaro ZL1

Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

Minutes before the much anticipated debut of the Chevy Camaro Z28, it was all over Twitter that the car revealed would actually be a ZL1. A high performance Camaro, the aluminum hood is raised with a vented insert, rear diffusers and spoiler, and 20 inch forged aluminum wheels. Under the hood is the LSA 6.2L V8 engine with a 6-speed manual transmission. The ZL1′s power comes from a supercharged aluminum-block 6.2-liter V8 producing an estimated 550 hp.

The interior is given as much attention as the exterior design with microfiber suede inserts on heated leather seats. Unique to the ZL1 is a leather wrapped shifter and steering wheel, redesigned with the bottom of the wheel squared off and ZL1 badges. The ZL1 is still in development, though, and is projected to be available in early 2012. The ZL1 name is taken from the 1969 Camaro ZL1, which had an aluminum block 440-hp 427-cubic inch V8.

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2012 Acura TL Sedan – We're Keeping Our Fingers Crossed

Tuesday February 8th, 2011 at 2:22 PM
Posted by: aquadog

2012 Acura TL SedanAcura will soon debut the newly revamped 2012 Acura TL sedan at the Chicago Auto Show this week. Acura released a teaser photo of the car’s slightly refreshed rear, but what we’re really looking forward to is the reveal of the front fascia and the rest of the new TL’s specs. Public opinion and a lot of grumbling from our own team of editors at CarReview disliked the current style of the 2009 – 2011 Acura TL. Many are crossing their fingers, hanging garlic in their house, and picking up pennies everywhere with hopes that Acura will lose the ugly design of the current TL.

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2010 Acura MDX Review

Friday August 6th, 2010 at 8:88 AM
Posted by: hollyrrr

2010 Acura MDX SH-AWD
By Holly Roberts

Pros:

  • Comfortable seats
  • Roomy interior
  • Ventilated front seats (my favorite in the summer!)
  • Nice safety features (that take a bit of getting used to)
  • All kinds of places to put things so they are out of sight

Cons:

  • 3rd row seating is just for kids or those with very short legs!
  • Bluetooth kept dropping calls
  • Collision Mitigation Braking system (I hated it!)


The MDX is definitely an SUV, and a very luxurious one at that.  Having seen a lot of MDX’s on the road over the last few years, I had no idea how roomy they really were.  In my opinion, the design of the 2nd generation model is a huge improvement over the first generation models.  Naturally, we get to review the most-blinged out models, and this one surely did not disappoint!

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