2016 Ford Mustang GT Convertible Review

Wednesday June 22nd, 2016 at 10:66 AM
Posted by: D.Colman

2016 Ford Mustang GT Convertible

By David Colman

Hypes: 5.0 V8 is wicked quick, with sound to match
Gripes: Does a Steering Wheel really need 18 buttons?

The latest offering in Ford’s rag top pony car line is a very endearing product. Hot Rodders will love it for its 435hp and bellowing exhaust note. Sun worshippers will give it high grades for its expansive tanning bed. Back road carvers will grant it high marks for its handling dexterity. About the only souls predisposed to condemnation are mileage nerds who will look askance at the GT’s combined EPA rating of 19 MPG. Believe me, that’s a small price to pay for the repetitive fun dividend this Ford provides every day.

2016 Ford Mustang GT Convertible

As has been the case since this model’s inception in 1964, there are pretend Mustangs and there are real Mustangs. The pretend stallions are gelded at birth with just 6 cylinders under the hood. The real Mustangs come off the Flat Rock assembly line with a proper V8 in the engine bay. In the case of our Competition Orange test GT, proper refers to a 5.0 liter V8 massaged to produce 435hp and 400lb.-ft. of torque. The best of all drivertrains to harness this output is the 6-speed manual transmission, coupled to a 3.31:1 rear axle ratio, both of which are available at no extra cost. The manual shift is a work of art, from the incised pattern on its chromed knob to the lockout lift ring for reverse gear. The levers throws are ultra short and satisfying. The clutch pedal’s precise engagement makes slamming home shifts at redline a true driver’s delight. Enthusiasts will never run short of enthusiasm for driving this manual gearbox Mustang GT.

2016 Ford Mustang GT Convertible

Unlike so many front-engine muscle cars, the GT does not disappoint when the occasion arises to tackle some curves. In that regard, Ford has done everything to make the Mustang a stellar handling pony car. Confidence in curves starts with the right underpinnings. Here, Mustang was an early adopter of fully independent rear suspension to go along with independent front suspension. This pairing results in a balanced, controllable platform which is fine tuned by a stout front strut tower brace and a standard limited slip rear axle that prevents wheelspin. All GTs offer standard electronic line-lock for optimizing drag race starts, plus a bevy of “Mustang Tack Apps” that allow you to monitor g-forces, braking times, acceleration times in the quarter mile, as well as 0-60mph times.

2016 Ford Mustang GT Convertible

The convertible version of the GT is remarkably stiff. You will never sense the chassis flexing, even when traversing railroad tracks with the top down. And speaking of that top, it will fold itself into a neat covered receptacle in less than 10 seconds. All you have to do is manually release a hefty T-shaped lock handle to disconnect the roof header from the windshield surround. Dropping the roof automatically lowers all four side windows. However, raising the roof requires you to elevate on your own those same side windows. Ford has provided a sizeable glass rear window and equipped it with heating coils to keep it clear. Even with the top raised, visibility to the rear and sides is surprisingly good considering the GT’s sleek proportions.

2016 Ford Mustang GT Convertible

You will definitely want to order your convertible with the slick and relatively inexpensive “California Special Package” ($1,995) which pays tribute to a rare GT/CS Mustang Ford built in the late 1960s for California only. In today’s version of that Golden State look back, Ford supplies exceptionally handsome 19 inch painted and machined ebony alloy wheels which carry hefty Pirelli P Zero Nero rubber measuring 255/40R19 at each corner. These wheels and tires alone would cost you twice the California Special Package surcharge were you to order the combo from your local tire store. In addition to the sticky footprint, the package also includes a piano black tail spoiler, plus very handsome ebony accents on the hood and rockers that utilize decreasing size Ben Day dots to accentuate the Mustang’s swooping lines. The almost equally expensive “Shaker Pro Audio System” ($1,795) is an item I could live without. Since we spent most of our week with the top dropped, the Shaker’s 12 speaker system and huge trunk-mounted sub woofer was hard pressed to compete with the sound of rushing air.

2016 Ford Mustang GT Convertible

The GT Convertible includes very nice 3-stage heated front seats. The interior is well laid out in terms of door design, low instrument panel height, and reach to the shift console. There’s a tad too much chrome on the auxiliary switch control panel located at the foot of the center stack. The HVAC blower switch is too small and difficult to activate. But all in all, the Mustang GT offers drivers the best interior design of any muscle car on the market today. Be thankful you can still buy this much high performance for this little outlay today.

Ford Mustang GT Convertible

  • Engine: 5.0 Liter TI-VCT V8
  • Horsepower: 435hp
  • Torque: 400lb.-ft.
  • Fuel Consumption: 15 MPG City/25 MPG Highway
  • Price as Tested: $47,380
  • Star Rating: 10+ out of 10 Stars

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Review: 2015 Ford Mustang Eco Boost 4

Tuesday October 13th, 2015 at 3:1010 PM
Posted by: D.Colman

2015 Ford Mustang Eco Boost 4

By David Colman

Hypes: Eco Boost Motor is a Keeper, Stellar Exterior Redo
Gripes: Needs Rear Wiper, Closer 2nd-3rd Gear Ratios

Back in the first 1960s heyday of the Mustang, if you saw a button on the dash marked “Shaker” you knew that the ram intake on your hood would open when you pressed that magic button. More cold air meant more horsepower. Because the induction scoop was mounted on the engine and was not part of the hood, it would vibrate in synch with the engine, earning it the name Shaker. The 2015 Mustang has a “Shaker” button on the dash, but this one has nothing at all to do with increasing air intake. Rather, it refers to an optional $1,795 “Shaker Pro Audio System” which includes 12 speakers. The button simply enhances the rush of hot air through those dozen speakers, not the rush of cold air into your motor.

2015 Ford Mustang Eco Boost 4

Once I got over the initial disappointment of that generational descriptive shift, I discovered that the latest Mustang has lost nothing of its rambunctious nature, active hood scoop or not. Our Ingot Silver Metallic test bullet fully lives up to the brand’s storied reputation. Without question, this is the best Mustang Ford has ever built. Three engine options are available this year, with the V6 model being the most affordable at a base price of $23,600. The subject of this test is the EcoBoost Premium Fastback, with a turbocharged 2.4 liter inline 4, and a Base Price of $29,300. The least expensive V8 Mustang is the GT Fastback, which carries a Base Price of $32,100. It’s been quite awhile since Ford sold a 4 cylinder Mustang, so we were curious to see whether such a fuel efficient power source (25 MPG Combined City/Highway) could cut it in the performance department. With its output of 310hp @ 5500rpm and 320lb.-ft. of torque @ 3000rpm, the answer is an unqualified yes. Even when coupled to the 6-speed “Select Shift” automatic transmission ($1,195), the turbo Mustang was always up to the task of rapid mobilization.

2015 Ford Mustang Eco Boost 4

The Select Shift gearbox can be slotted into a Sport setting marked “S” on the floor console. Once you’ve selected that quadrant, the small paddle shifts behind the steering wheel can be used for all up and down gear changes. The only drawback to the automatic gearbox is its big gap between 2nd and 3rd gears. Most of the time, you will lose 1500rpm when shifting up, which puts the small displacement four banger at an acceleration disadvantage. I would much prefer to see these two most frequently used gear ratios closer together for back road work.

2015 Ford Mustang Eco Boost 4

Other than that shortcoming, the turbo 4 Mustang runs back roads like a scalded snake. The optional “Eco Boost Performance Package” ($1,995) is a must if your drives have more curves than straights. Ford engineering’s absolute stroke of genius is to equip the Performance Package enhanced Mustang with whopping fat Pirelli P Zero tires (255/40ZR19) at each corner, mounted on tastefully understated Ebony Black Painted aluminum wheels. The final flourish to this bargain priced package is inclusion of a 3.55:1 Limited Slip rear axle that insures your Mustang instant forward bite when you tromp the throttle.

Almost every time I started the Mustang, I made sure to engage my “Drive Mode” of choice. This is accomplished by flipping a chrome plated switch on the lower face of the central console to the setting marked with a helmet for “Track.” This configures the suspension for sport driving and reallocates the shift points to maximize thrust. Next to that switch is an identical toggle for steering feedback, which I always set to “Sport.” With these preparations made, the Mustang hunkered down over its Pirellis and absolutely refused to slide or deviate in any way from my selected line through switchback turns.

2015 Ford Mustang Eco Boost 4

On the window sticker, Ford identifies the Mustang as a “”4-Passenger Sports Car.” After spending a week behind the wheel, I would never quibble with that description, though I must admit to a preference for the front seat rather than the limited vision back seat. If you do carry passengers in back, you’ll want to provide them with air sickness bags because the latest Mustang is a true g-Force generator second to none.

2015 Ford Mustang Eco Boost 4

  • Engine: 2.3 Liter inline 4, DOHC, Direct Injection, Turbocharged
  • Horsepower: 310hp @ 5500rpm
  • Torque: 320lb.-ft.@3000rpm
  • Fuel Consumption: 21MPG City/32MPG Highway
  • Price as Tested: $37,790
  • Star Rating: 10 out of 10 Stars

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Review: 2013 Ford Mustang GT California Special

Wednesday May 1st, 2013 at 12:55 AM
Posted by: D.Colman

By David Colman

Hypes: Stellar Cosmetics, GT Grunt
Gripes: Clunky Door Slam, Distracting Wide View Ext. Mirrors

Mustang enthusiasts have had more special editions to choose from than Baskin Robbins has flavors. Every year Ford or Shelby float new and tasty variations of this quintessential ponycar. One of the best packages in the car’s 49 year history is the California Special version of the Mustang GT. This package, which carries a surcharge of $1,995, substantially changes the look of the GT by adding faux side scoops behind the doors, a pair of working black air vents atop the hood, a pedestal rear spoiler, and ever-so-subtly faded hood stripes which match equally unobtrusive “GT/CS” side stripes. This economic package also includes unique black billet upper and lower grill bars highlighted by a tri-star pony badge, special front splitter with fog lights, and unique rear diffuser and badging.

Ford continues the custom motif inside, with model specific lettered floor mats, special front seats with Miko suede inserts and logo-embossed head rests, and a distinctive silver “GT/CS” inscription on the faux carbon fiber dash board. In the Sterling Gray Metallic shade of our test vehicle, these filigrees looked distinctive without being garish. A final pedigree is provided by black enameled, silver machined “GT” inscribed alloy rims (19” x 8.5”) bearing beefy Pirelli P Zero Nero competition tires measuring 245/45ZR19. The rims and rubber did wonders for both the looks and the handling.

This test GT/CS harnessed the 5.0 liter V-8’s 412hp to a 6-speed automatic ($1,195 extra) which includes, for the first time, a SelectShift Manual Mode. To engage this feature, you must first move the floor-mounted stick fully rearward into the Manual gate, then make your up and downshifts using a rocker switch appended to the left side of the shift knob. Due to the small size and remote placement of this switch, manual selections are difficult to make. This super sporty Mustang deserves paddles on the steering column, or at the very least, a bump stick for manual shifts. Given that the standard 6-speed manual is such a pleasure to operate, you’d be well advised to save the grand plus you’ll spend for the SelectShift automatic.

Because Ford equipped this particular GT with a 3.15:1 rear axle ratio, it returned 20 MPG in mixed driving. This is excellent mileage for such a powerful V-8, but I would have gladly forsaken a couple of MPG for better low end performance, by equipping the GT with a 3.37, 3.55 or 3.73 limited slip rear end ratio. All of these are available at no extra cost, and with any of them, the improvement in acceleration is remarkable.

Even with its gearbox and rear end limitations, the GT/CS Mustang is still a total blast to drive. You can hang the rear end out like a NASCAR star, because the sticky Pirellis always save the day. The fat rimmed steering wheel’s electric power assist provides accurate information about tire placement and adhesion. Although you can deselect traction control at will, the system is so well engineered that you never need to override this safety net to enjoy maximum performance. Above all else, the Mustang GT is a driver’s car. With GT/CS enhancements, it looks enough like a Kal Kustom to make you George Barris. In reality, though, this GT costs just $40,230.

43 years ago, Ford produced a limited run of 1968 California Special Mustangs (complete with faux side scoops) that have become cult cars in the collector market. There’s absolutely every reason to believe the exact same fate awaits this excellent reincarnation.

2013 Ford Mustang GT California Special

  • Engine: 5.0 liter DOHC 32 Valve V-8
  • Horsepower: 412hp
  • Torque: 390 lb.-ft.
  • Fuel Consumption: 18 MPG City/25 MPG Highway
  • Price as Tested: $40.230
  • Star Rating: 9 out of 10 Stars

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Review: 2013 Ford Mustang Boss 302

Wednesday May 1st, 2013 at 12:55 AM
Posted by: Francois

Hype: Stellar Cosmetics, GT Grunt
Gripes: Clunky Door Slam, Distracting Wide View Ext. Mirrors

Front to back, here are the significant features of the “base” Boss 302:

  • New aero package to reduce lift
  • A completely revised 444-horsepower engine with unique head castings, different exhaust valves and exhaust-side cams, upgraded internal materials in the valvetrain and pistons, and a long-tube custom runner intake drawing on Ford’s Daytona Prototype experience
  • The “Brembo package” found as an option on the 5.0 and supplied standard on the GT500 is here as well, upgraded with specific brake pads by Performance Friction and special brake lines for improved pedal feel
  • Stiffer springs surrounding five-position adjustable shock absorbers, and a bigger rear swaybar
  • Three-way adjustable electric power steering
  • A second set of exhaust pipes exiting to the sides to reduce backpressure and terrify anybody who happens to be in the same tunnel as a Boss 302
  • Nineteen-inch wheels with Pirelli P-Zero tires

That’s a long list of revisions, and they’re all important to the Boss mission of “balanced performance.” But as we climb the sixteen-percent grade of a Monterey canyon road, it’s the monstrous engine that makes its presence most immediately known. This car is too fast for all but the most gnarled back roads, reaching effortlessly into the triple digits between corners and pulling relentlessly from three grand all the way to the 7,500 rpm soft rev limiter. No factory ponycar has ever offered this kind of pace in these conditions — only Ford’s own 2011 aluminum-block GT500 can even mount a challenge.

After just a few miles of observing this car’s ability to warp time and space, we back off the throttle and relax. As good as the brakes are, they really aren’t up to the challenge of endless ABS-cycling high-speed entries down long, steep hills. It would take Corvette-ZR1-sized platters to dissipate that kind of heat, but this is a car that costs less than a base ‘Vette. Time to back off — and we’ve made the right choice, as the local police have woken up to the fact that there are a dozen Mustangs with side-facing exhausts racing around the area. We’d better find a place where this kind of power can be safely uncorked.

Compared to the Sibling: The Ford Mustang GT
Mustang enthusiasts have had more special editions to choose from than Baskin Robbins has flavors. Every year Ford or Shelby float new and tasty variations of this quintessential ponycar. One of the best packages in the car’s 49 year history is the California Special version of the Mustang GT. This package, which carries a surcharge of $1,995, substantially changes the look of the GT by adding faux side scoops behind the doors, a pair of working black air vents atop the hood, a pedestal rear spoiler, and ever-so-subtly faded hood stripes which match equally unobtrusive “GT/CS” side stripes. This economic package also includes unique black billet upper and lower grill bars highlighted by a tri-star pony badge, special front splitter with fog lights, and unique rear diffuser and badging.

Ford continues the custom motif inside, with model specific lettered floor mats, special front seats with Miko suede inserts and logo-embossed head rests, and a distinctive silver “GT/CS” inscription on the faux carbon fiber dash board. In the Sterling Gray Metallic shade of our test vehicle, these filigrees looked distinctive without being garish. A final pedigree is provided by black enameled, silver machined “GT” inscribed alloy rims (19” x 8.5”) bearing beefy Pirelli P Zero Nero competition tires measuring 245/45ZR19. The rims and rubber did wonders for both the looks and the handling.

This test GT/CS harnessed the 5.0 liter V-8’s 412hp to a 6-speed automatic ($1,195 extra) which includes, for the first time, a SelectShift Manual Mode. To engage this feature, you must first move the floor-mounted stick fully rearward into the Manual gate, then make your up and downshifts using a rocker switch appended to the left side of the shift knob. Due to the small size and remote placement of this switch, manual selections are difficult to make. This super sporty Mustang deserves paddles on the steering column, or at the very least, a bump stick for manual shifts. Given that the standard 6-speed manual is such a pleasure to operate, you’d be well advised to save the grand plus you’ll spend for the SelectShift automatic.

Because Ford equipped this particular GT with a 3.15:1 rear axle ratio, it returned 20 MPG in mixed driving. This is excellent mileage for such a powerful V-8, but I would have gladly forsaken a couple of MPG for better low end performance, by equipping the GT with a 3.37, 3.55 or 3.73 limited slip rear end ratio. All of these are available at no extra cost, and with any of them, the improvement in acceleration is remarkable.

Even with its gearbox and rear end limitations, the GT/CS Mustang is still a total blast to drive. You can hang the rear end out like a NASCAR star, because the sticky Pirellis always save the day. The fat rimmed steering wheel’s electric power assist provides accurate information about tire placement and adhesion. Although you can deselect traction control at will, the system is so well engineered that you never need to override this safety net to enjoy maximum performance. Above all else, the Mustang GT is a driver’s car. With GT/CS enhancements, it looks enough like a Kal Kustom to make you George Barris. In reality, though, this GT costs just $40,230.

43 years ago, Ford produced a limited run of 1968 California Special Mustangs (complete with faux side scoops) that have become cult cars in the collector market. There’s absolutely every reason to believe the exact same fate awaits this excellent reincarnation.

2013 Ford Mustang Boss 302

  • Standard Engine 5.0L V8
  • Standard Transmission 6 Speed Manual
  • Cylinders 8
  • Horsepower @RPM 444@7400
  • Fuel Economy Cty/Hwy 15/26
  • Combined Fuel Economy 19
  • Engine and Transmission: 5.0 V-8/6M
  • skidpad 0.89 g.
  • 1/4 mile 12.92 sec.
  • 0-60 4.7 sec.
  • 1/4 mile 112.47 mph.
  • Star Rating: 9 Stars out of 10

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2013 Ford Mustang V6 Review

Thursday December 6th, 2012 at 9:1212 AM
Posted by: D.Colman

By David Colman

Hypes: V8 Performance at V6 Price
Gripes: Illegible Speedo, Chair Flop Annoyances

Most people think V-8 when they think Ford Mustang. To be sure, the brand’s identity is based on the architecture of the 8 cylinder engine. But with gas nudging the $5 per gallon mark, maybe it’s time to rethink the basic Mustang equation. Back in 1964, when Ford introduced the Mustang, the base model’s inline 6 cylinder engine was a weak-kneed shadow of the optional V8. Today, however, the base V6 is a sophisticated triumph of compact engineering, with coil-on-plug electronics and a 12.4 quart oil sump that is just half a quart shy of the 5.0 liter V8’s 13 quart oil pan. Best of all, the latest 24 valve, DOHC V6 makes 305hp and 280 lb.-ft. of torque, and earns an EPA overall fuel rating of 22 MPG.

If you’re going to go the V6 route, then you’ll really want to back up the engine with Ford’s sweet shifting 6-speed manual transmission, which features hill-hold for 2013. This gearbox will help you extract every last ounce of performance from the high-revving V6. The stubby aluminum and leather shift knob glides from gate to gate with just a nudge. Performance off the line is particularly explosive if you stipulate the V6 Performance Package ($1,395), which provides extra initial surge through a 3.71:1 rear axle ratio with Limited Slip differential gears. The “track pack” which for 2013 is available on automatic transmission V6 Mustangs, also brings you distinctive looking painted and machined 19 inch diameter alloy rims fitted with premium Pirelli P Zero tires measuring 225/40ZR19.

These 220 Treadwear Rated Pirellis contribute prodigious amounts of side bite to the Mustang’s athletic cornering ability. If you select the correct gear to keep the V6 on full boil, this economy Mustang will run with much more expensive, higher powered sports cars on any backroad. Of course, with an out-the-door price of just $32,025, you’ll have to accept a few shortcomings in the mix. The spring tension on the clutch release mechanism is so strong that the Mustang will leap forward on the 1st to 2nd gear upchange even before you feed in throttle. This can be disconcerting at first, but you quickly learn to adapt your driving style to this eccentricity.

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The Five Ugliest Cars of All Time

Tuesday November 29th, 2011 at 7:1111 AM
Posted by: m35man

Raise your hand if you’ve owned an ugly car. Scream out loud if you actually loved your ugly car.

1975 AMC PacerLet’s face it—for every great car we produce on this planet, they’re bound to be a couple of real duds. Unfortunately, failure is just a fact of life. These vehicles probably looked really good on the drawing board, but in reality they were design disasters that are best forgotten.

1.) 1975 AMC Pacer: One of the lowest points in the history of car making, the AMC Pacer was a disaster of great proportions on many levels—from the 95hp inline 6-cylinder engine all the way to the terrible fuel economy—18mpg. So, not only did it not turn heads (except in shock), this vehicle rode like a covered wagon with one bad wheel. The design reminds me of something you’d see in a 1950’s “B” sci-fi film. Consequently, the Pacer has become the poster child of 1970’s bad automotive design. If there are any of these cars left out there, they should be destroyed, for the good of the race and the culture. When other civilizations look back on us 1,000 years from now, the Pacer will undoubtedly be cited as the beginning of the end.

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2011 Ford Mustang GT Review

Monday October 17th, 2011 at 3:1010 PM
Posted by: D.Colman

2011 Ford Mustang GT
By David Colman

Likes:

  • Incredible Bang for the Buck
  • Everyday Practicality

Dislikes:

  • Limited Rear Vision
  • No Separate Gas Cap

The latest iteration of the long-lived Mustang GT has to be the bargain performance sensation of the year. When correctly optioned, this $36,000 evolution of Ford’s original pony car of 1964 is a ferocious street fighter capable of punching twice its weight.

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2011 Ford Mustang Review – Driving impressions of the V6, 6-speed manual

Monday May 16th, 2011 at 9:55 AM
Posted by: twain

2011_ford_mustang_12
By Twain Mein

Pros:

  • V8 performance with fuel economy that matches a V6
  • Seat comfort better than the Copacabana lounge
  • Intuitive and easy to use infotainment system

Cons:

  • Unable to integrate my iPhone and confusing Bluetooth controls
  • Rear seat configuration not child booster seat friendly

I Want to See You in the Morning

We recently drove the 2011 Mustang V6 Coupe “Premium Edition” which included leather interior, nav system, “Shaker” stereo, power seats, and the” Mustang Club of America” package (high performance 235/50/18 tires and styling accents). Additionally, this model had a 6-speed automatic, performance 3.31 axle ratio, HID headlamps, and rear view camera. As equipped, the base price of $25,845 swelled to $32,580.

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Porsche, Buick, Modern Muscle Cars at the 2011 North American International Auto Show in Detroit

Wednesday January 19th, 2011 at 9:11 PM
Posted by: ponycargirl

©2011 Megan Green - Porsche 918 Spyder RSR at 2011 NAIASArticle and photos by Megan Green

Porsche 918 RSR
At a 6:30 a.m. press conference in snowy Detroit, the press gathered around in anticipation of the first reveal of the day. With smoky fanfare, Porsche rolled out their 918 RSR , a high-end hybrid sports car. The best of the 2010 Spyder concept and 911 GT3 R hybrid were combined to create the fluid yet powerful two-seat coupe powered by a V8 mid-engine. Two electric motors on the front axle contribute as well as store power while braking, utilizing its flywheel accumulator – taking the place of a second seat to the right of the driver. On the console, modern touch technology is eschewed in favor of rocker switches. Finishing aesthetic touches include brown leather bucket seats and steering wheel, wing doors, with the body painted a cool blue accented with bright orange racing stripes and brake calipers. It’s just a shame that the 918 RSR didn’t stick around for more admiration during the public show days.

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First Impressions Review: 2011 Ford Mustang – V6 engine with no excuses

Monday August 16th, 2010 at 10:88 AM
Posted by: twain

By Twain Mein

We drove the 2011 V6 Coupe “Premium Edition” (includes leather, nav system, “shaker” stereo, power seats) and the” Mustang Club of America” package (high performance 235/50/18 tires and styling accents). Additionally, this model had a 6-speed automatic, performance 3.31 axle ratio, HID headlamps, and rear view camera. Base price is $25,845. But as equipped, MSRP was $32,580.

Ford’s marketing department touts the V-6 as having “no excuses”. After my stint behind the wheel, I wholeheartedly agree. But it wasn’t love at first sight.

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